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the great arizona orphan abduction book review

And I would have loved to have known what happened to all those children in the end. However, it is much more than that. influencers in the know since 1933. by As Gordon makes clear in writing so alive it makes the reader smell sagebrush and white supremacy, the Eastern nuns didn’t realize that, in turn-of-the-century Arizona, Catholic also meant Mexican, and Mexican meant inferior.”—Debra Dickerson, Salon, “Gordon is genuinely curious and deeply thoughtful about the complex ways in which race, class and gender intersect to produce pivotal moments like this one. STUDY. Elie Wiesel, by RELEASE DATE: July 8, 2015. It doesn't matter what the date is, what the town is, or what the state is: white folk are just not going to let the rights of anyone of a different color or persuasion be easily exercised. | What makes a good home for these children? A dry pedantic recitation in paragraph form of every minute detail unearthed in research about two small copper mining towns in Arizona in the early 1900s. Anglo women organized their men into a posse which kidnapped the children from the Mexican families. | This is a fine grained analysis of a specific incident that tells much about the attitudes in the United States, particularly out west about race, but also about class and gender. His parish was almost exclusively Mexican. It is an ingenious narrative device that enables her to reconstitute the distinct social structures of the area while rendering a taut journalistic account of the unfolding drama… The magnificence of her achievement [is] her masterly assembly of historical detail and acute sensitivity to the intricacies of human relations as mediated by power, prejudice and the passing of time.”—Stephen Lassonde, The New York Times Book Review, “Written in the lush prose and plots of a Joseph Conrad novel, Linda Gordon’s The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction is [an] extraordinary chronicle… More than an isolated case of frontier vigilantism, the affair swirled into the national headlines, fanning the flames of the caustic debate over religion and race… Peeling off the overlapping intrigues, issues, and players of the incident with the precision of a historical detective, Gordon, a leading social historian on issues of gender and family, goes far beyond the question of blatant racism in a racist epoch to examine the cultural and historical makeup that allowed the affair to happen in the first place… Her meticulously researched and reasoned chronicle is a masterwork of historical analysis that deserves to remain on bookshelves far into the future.”—Jeff Biggers, Bloomsbury Review, “If Gordon’s book did nothing more than redeem from obscurity the story of the Arizona orphans, it would be an extraordinary contribution to social history. Authors: Paula S. Fass. Soon the town's Anglos, furious at this "interracial" transgression, formed a vigilante squad that kidnapped the children and nearly lynched the nuns and the local priest. Books About Racism Sell Out at Amazon, B&N. This is an account of the attempt of the Catholic Foundling Home in New York City to place some Irish orphans with Mexican parents in a mining community in Arizona. This book alone could have set up all the major themes of my U.S. History course first quarter (1877-1919). Catherine Temerson, This moving, potent testament might have been titled “Black Lives Matter.” Or: “An American Tragedy.”, by Especially informative are Gordon’s lengthy discussions of historical definitions of whiteness and how the orphan abduction was instrumental in destroying the fluidity of race relations.”—E.W. I expected a story that was complex but very "human interest" in scope. Gordon began with great raw material: a gripping tale that sounds more like the plot of a TV mini-series than the subject of a university press book. A great deal of research went into the story, which is admirable, but make it hard to read through to the end. They didn't dare.) However, she is quick to point out that they may not be representative and that they only illustrate that what makes good parenting is difficult to determine. Reviewed on: 11/01/1999 Release date: 11/01/1999 Genre: Nonfiction Paperback - 432 pages - 978-0-674-00535-8. M. I'd never heard of the orphan trains until this book opened my eyes to them; it's apparently a part of American history that nobody wanted to talk about. In some ways the children as well as the Mexicans get lost in this story. While the title suggest that the books focus in the Arizona Orphan Abduction, the abduction serves more as a rational for a look at the social, labor, race and feminist history of the mining towns of the soutwest. RELEASE DATE: Jan. 16, 2006. As a challenge to preconceived notions of American history, as a reflection of cultural, religious and economic realities and as a how-to guide for retrieving important historical lessons, The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction is fascinating, repelling and completely engrossing.”—Ian Graham, The Newark Star-Ledger, “Linda Gordon’s The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction is a spellbinding narrative history—the kind of rigorous but engaging work that other academics dream of writing. UNITED STATES Linda Gordon is the Florence Kelley Professor of History at New York University. Soon the town's Anglos, furious at this "interracial" transgression, formed a vigilante squad that kidnapped the children and nearly lynched the nuns and the local priest. Linda Gordon It is a history of the mining town and the racism of whites towards Mexicans. There are strains of religion in this book as well since the criteria for the sisters of the order were good catholic homes. Gordon seemed to dig so deep and so far afield of the actual event to prove her points, that I found it irritating. Test. The Cat. Yes, of course. Magazine Subscribers (How to Find Your Reader Number). I found the whole story bizarre and interesting. However, who decides that? Are those same powers still exerting those impacts? The identities of each group of players involved in this minor-event-turned-supreme-court-case help Gordon successfully explore implications of class, gender, and race in early southwest US 20th century. Howard, he writes, “had always been one of the most critical gathering posts for black people.” He calls it The Mecca, and its faculty and his fellow students expanded his horizons, helping him to understand “that the black world was its own thing, more than a photo-negative of the people who believe they are white.” Coates refers repeatedly to whites’ insistence on their exclusive racial identity; he realizes now “that nothing so essentialist as race” divides people, but rather “the actual injury done by people intent on naming us, intent on believing that what they have named matters more than anything we could ever actually do.” After he married, the author’s world widened again in New York, and later in Paris, where he finally felt extricated from white America’s exploitative, consumerist dreams. Linda Gordon’s book confronts all these issues… Delving deeper and deeper into the American conscience, Gordon shatters layer upon layer of assumption. In 1904, Catholic nuns in New York sent 40 Irish children on an "orphan train" to a small Arizona mining town, where they would be cared for by Catholic families—Mexican Catholic families. The hitch was that those families turned out to be dark-skinned Mexicans.

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